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June 26, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, June 28, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, June 28, 2015

Pride is often labeled as the queen of all sins; it is often suggested as the first and greatest sin. Of the seven things that God is said to explicitly hate, pride or “haughty eyes” (Proverbs 6:16) is listed first. Pride is suggested as the core issue that resulted in the fall of Lucifer and eventually man. The Scripture declares: “Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18). The essence of pride is self, setting itself in contention with and opposition to God Himself. Pride is thinking much about one’s self and thinking about one’s self much. Pride is inordinate self-love where there should be love of God and love for others. Pride is anti-God and anti-others. God is opposed to the proud (James 4:6, 1 Peter 5:5). Pride defies: “You shall have no other gods before me” (Exodus 20:3).

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June 19, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, June 21, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, June 21, 2015

This is how God’s grace works: in His Son, God loves sinners as they are. He finds sinners in their confused state of pride and foolishness, in the mess of rebellion, enslavement, and condemnation. But while this is where grace meets sinners, God is not content to leave them as He finds them. Sinners who trust Jesus are adopted into God’s family. Grace then provides strong parental direction, guidance, aid, and empowerment. As a result, His children begin turning aside from their entrenched patterns of vices and toward acquiring new patterns of virtues. The grace of God that was embodied in Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection is now active by the Holy Spirit in the hearts of God’s children.

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June 12, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, June 14, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, June 14, 2015

A faulty view concerning the Gospel’s relationship to everyday life was the factor that accounted for the lack of impact from the church at Crete. There is a direct link between the truth of the Gospel and the type of behavior that corresponds to the Gospel. But, false teachers were distorting the Gospel’s message. Thus, Gospel transformation was not taking place. With the doctrines of the Gospel waning in the church, low levels of moral character development and high levels of indifference toward good works, was waxing. The increase of false teaching profoundly affected the church: practical godliness decreased. With that in mind, Paul wrote to Titus saying, “This is why I left you in Crete, so that you might put what remained into order, and appoint elders in every town as I directed you” (1:5).

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May 29, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 31, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 31, 2015

Following the opening phrase of the benediction are two profound statements that contain the essential elements of the letter. Each statement of thought revolves around Jesus. The first statement stresses what God has done by His Son to secure a people. The prayer acknowledges that peace has come because God has “brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant” (13:20). God raised Jesus from the dead thereby exalting Christ as Lord who is now at His right hand. In acknowledging Him as the great shepherd, it is declared that Jesus surpasses all the other leaders of God’s people. Jesus is the One who ultimately fulfills all the roles God desires from the One who is over His people (Ezekiel 34:10-16; John 10:11,14). The exalted position granted to Jesus has been secured on the merits of His sacrificial death, which effected the establishment of a new covenant. In contrast to the old covenant, which was temporary, the new covenant is everlasting. The prophets promised an eternal covenant that would bring God and His people together forever (Isaiah 55:3; Jeremiah 31:35-37; 32:40; Ezekiel 37:26). The new covenant is the ultimate expression of how God’s eternal purposes of redemption are secured.

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May 22, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 24, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 24, 2015

Although followers of Christ no longer participate in the old covenant sacrifices, they do offer appropriate sacrifices. The author lists two practical sacrifices that typify followers of Christ. First, “let us continually offer up a sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of lips that acknowledge his name” (13:15). Whether the brethren assemble or are out among the unbelieving world, followers of Christ are to publically praise Jesus through confessions, prayers, conversations, and songs. Second, “do good and to share what you have, for such sacrifices are pleasing to God” (13:16). As they had already been doing (6:10; 10:34), followers of Christ eagerly meet the practical needs of one another.

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May 15, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 17, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 17, 2015

But it is interesting that the writer of Hebrews concludes with a few very practical instructions. Where has this practical instruction been up to this point? Christianity, since it is absolutely true, is relevant and practical. The Bible and its teachings are not just things to think about; they are to be applied to life (2 Timothy 3:14-17). However, Christianity is not simply a collection of practical directions for making life nicer or more pleasant. The heart of Christianity is not simply practicing hospitality, showing compassion, maintaining faithfulness in marriage, and handling money properly. Each of these practices is precious and important, but Christians are called to do them in a distinctively Christian fashion. They cannot be done Christianly without proper grounds.

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May 8, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 10, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 10, 2015

The difference in mood between the two mountains is profound; the fervent joy that characterizes the heavenly gathering stands in contrast to the foreboding terror the Israelites experienced at the base of Mount Sinai. The reason for the difference is due to the different message that is now spoken from Mount Zion: “to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood that speaks a better word than the blood of Abel” (12:24). Whereas the blood of Abel spoke a message of condemnation on Cain, the blood of Christ speaks a word of forgiveness and cleansing. Thus, the difference in God, presented as the “judge of all” at Mount Zion in contrast to Mount Sinai is the difference between God as the judge who graciously vindicates His people through the blood of His Son, and God as the judge who justly condemns the guilty in their sin.

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May 1, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 3, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, May 3, 2015

The readers needed to realize that their sufferings were ultimately discipline from their Heavenly Father. Therefore, “It is for discipline that you have to endure. God is treating you as sons” (12:7). The Lord’s discipline is not arbitrary, but rather an expression of genuine relationship. In fact, the term discipline suggests loving training given to correct or improve actions and attitudes. The Lord only gives such training to those who are legitimately His: “If you are left without discipline, in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons” (12:8). By reflecting on the link between their adoption and their sufferings, they could take heart that the Lord has not abandoned them. He truly loves them! What God was doing is what any loving father does.

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April 24, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, April 26, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, April 26, 2015

Long-distance running is difficult. Running with endurance requires concentrated attention. The strong call to run with faithful endurance is set in the context of a crucial accompanying call to consider Jesus’ faithful endurance: “looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God” (12:2). Since chapter 11 likened faith to seeing, the writer’s call to look to Jesus is a call for running to be done with complete dependence or reliance upon Him. The support and strength required for running the race that God has fixed, is found in Jesus.

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April 17, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, April 19, 2015

Study Sheet for Sunday, April 19, 2015

Hebrews 11:32-40
Study #29

Hebrews 11:32-40 concludes the Old Testament models of faithful endurance. Hebrews 11 has explained the nature of faithful endurance by primarily pointing to examples of faithful endurance under the old covenant. In this concluding unit, and before the readers are reminded of Christ’s faithful endurance (12:1-12), a summary is given, which not only names additional examples, but also describes a full array of outcomes that the Old Testament believers experienced. The outcomes described, amid faithful endurance, were both triumphal and tragic. Hebrews 11:32-40 has three parts. First, some who faithfully endured would receive great triumph in life (11:32-35a). Next, others who faithfully endured would face great tragedy in life (11:35b-38). Finally, God, who has something better planned for them, commends all who faithfully endured (11:39-40).
The exemplars of faith listed in 11:4-31 were each introduced by the phrase, “by faith.” After each person was introduced, particular details about their faithful endurance were explained. Now, 11:32 changes to simply a list of six names: “And what more shall I say? For time would fail me to tell of Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephthah, of David and Samuel and the prophets.” The particular details surrounding their faithful endurance were omitted. However, the original readers would have been able to recall details from the corresponding Scriptures that told about these men.
The six figures span the periods of Israel’s history from the judges through the united monarchy. Then the mention of the prophets could include the periods from the divided monarchy to the exilic and through to the returning remnant. While the Scriptures present Samuel in an exceedingly glowing fashion, it explores both sides of the other five exemplars of faith: Gideon was tentative and doubtful; Barak was passive and fearful; Samson was morally lax; Jephthah was foolishly rash; and David was an adulterous murderer. The list illustrates how God works through a people who trust Him.
Gideon (Judges 7:1-25) was a judge of Israel, whom God used to bring about a crushing victory over the Midianites. By faith, Gideon and 300 men equipped with torches in clay jars and trumpets, sent the Midianite forces into confusion. Barak (Judges 4-5) was also a judge of Israel. Barak, accompanied by the prophetess Deborah, went up against a Canaanite force of 900 chariots. But God gave the Canaanites into Barak’s hands, when a downpour immobilized their superior military edge. Samson (Judges 13-16) was a judge of Israel as well. Set apart as a Nazirite to deliver Israel from the Philistines, Samson was endowed by the Spirit of God with great strength. Jephthah (Judges 11), also a judge of Israel, was a mighty warrior whom God used to overthrow the Ammonities. David, Israel’s dearest and greatest king, from the time that he slew Goliath as a young man until the time that he took the reigns over Israel and established her borders in peace and security, consistently showed great reliance upon and love for the Lord. Samuel (1 Samuel) was Israel’s last judge and long tenured prophet whose life was marked by courage and intercession on behalf of Israel. The prophets, mentioned in a generic way, exemplified faithful endurance amid extremely hostile circumstances, both in their message as well as in their lives.
Hebrews 11:33-34 moves from individuals who modeled faithful endurance to list some of the great triumphs that they received, “through faith conquered kingdoms, enforced justice, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions, quenched the power of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, were made strong out of weakness, became mighty in war, put foreign armies to flight.” Nine descriptions are strung together to describe the various types of deliverances that were experienced by those who received triumph by faith. Some of the men just previously mentioned could specifically be linked to these descriptions, but in other cases, many other exemplars of faith come to mind: Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, Abednigo, Elijah, Elisha, Jeremiah. Then a tenth description is a pinnacle of triumph: “women received back their dead by resurrection.”(11:35a). The poor widow of Zarapheth and the woman of Shunem each received sons back from the dead through the hands of Elijah and Elisha (1 Kings 17:17-24; 2 Kings 4:17-37).
In the middle of verse 35, the emphasis shifts from the triumphs received through faith to the tragedies faced through faith: “Some were tortured, refusing to accept release, so that they might rise again to a better life. Others suffered mocking and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword. They went about in skins of sheep and goats, destitute, afflicted, mistreated” (11:35a-37). Certainly, the lives of the prophets would come to mind as this list of tragedies is considered (Matthew 23:37). There is a wide range of outcomes that can be experienced through faith: some are brought back to life (11:35a), while others suffer death (11:37); some escape the sword (11:34), while others are killed by the sword (11:37); some rout armies (11:35), while others are captured and imprisoned (11:35-36); some rule over others (11:32), while others are ruined by others (11:37).
But of these who suffered mistreatment, Hebrews adds: “of whom the world was not worthy” (11:38). Judged by the world to be unworthy, God saw things differently. God actually assessed that the world was unworthy of them. And as it was stated in 11:2, it is now restated: “And all these…” were, “commended through their faith.” And yet, though commended for their resolute determination to trust the Lord, they had yet “receive what was promised” (11:39). While many of the original readers were facing a great testing, the old covenant believers faced much more severe affliction. Faithful endurance would be the proper path for a people who were called by a Savior who faithfully endured, for faithful endurance was the path of a people awaiting the Savior.
In fact, because of Christ’s faithful endurance, what the previous exemplars of faith never received has now arrived: “God had provided something better for us, that apart from us they should not be made perfect” (11:40). With the ratification of the new covenant by the death of Christ, old covenant believers join together with new covenant believers to know the conscience-cleansing, drawing-near-to-God-enabling, eternal inheritance of all the saints. What the Old Testament believers awaited is now here.

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